EEC memory is one of the fields we specialise in here at Mem-Star Distribution. This is why we’ve pulled together this guide to help you understand the difference between the two.

Error Checking and Correction (ECC) memory

EEC memory is one of the fields we specialise in here at Mem-Star Distribution. This is why we’ve pulled together this guide to help you understand the difference between the two.

ECC Memory: What it Does.

With more critical data processes and complex tasks being carried out by more and more businesses finding reliable, and high capacity, memory for the server is essential.

After all, a system failure or data becoming corrupted, could be catastrophic for any organisation. But registered ECC memory provides a more stable environment than unbuffered which is why it is usually found in large enterprise networks. Error Checking and Correction (ECC) memory is mostly considered essential in environments these days. Single bit error checking and correction within an 8-bit byte allows for single bit errors to be both detected and corrected when they occur.

Instead of losing usable memory capacity, memory makers tend to add an additional chip to ECC memory for every eight storage chips. When a single bit error is detected, the parity information is used to reconstruct the data with an error.

 

Registered ECC

  • A memory module in computers that have a register between the DRAM modules and the the systems memory controller
  • A memory module in computers that have a register between the DRAM modules and the the systems memory controller
  • There is a high reliabilty in stored data
  • Place less electrical load on the memory controller
  • Provides more stability
  • Costly
  • Used for servers and other mission-critical systems that require a stable operating environment
  • Used for servers and other mission-critical systems that require a stable operating environment

 

Unbuffered ECC (Unregistered ECC)

  • A memory module in a computer that does not have a register between the DRAM module and the system’s memory controller
  • Also known as Unregistered RAM
  • There is less reliability in stored data
  • Place more electrical load on the memory
  • Provides less stability
  • Less costly
  • Used in server/workstation applications

 

Handy Tip.

• Do not mix module types
• Replace Non-ECC with Non-ECC
• Replace ECC with ECC

Be aware that adding Non-ECC to ECC systems will disable the error correcting function. Systems will still operate, but ECC features will be nulified.

 

How to tell which type of RAM you have.

You can tell if your system has ECC RAM by counting the number of block memory chips on each module.

ECC modules have a chip count that is divisible by 3 or 5. The extra chip is the one that checks if the data was correctly processed by the memory module. (See image above)

Non-ECC memory does not have this extra error detecting feature.

 

Conclusion.

The benefits of ECC registered memory out way the drawbacks because servers require alot of memory which must be reliable which is why the vast majority of server memory is registered.

For businesses that has an important server that runs customer facing websites or a server that goes down regularly meaning employees can’t work, ECC memory is a must have.

The amount of money that the business would lose from having the server down for a couple of days is alot more than a business would spend on purchasing ECC memory.

So, although not everyone needs ECC memory, it is the safe bet, a more professional and reliable option.

 

If you are thinking about upgrading your PC and need help answering any questions regarding how much RAM you may require, the frequency or whether to opt for any of our ECC Modules:

Call our memory experts TODAY for help and information as to which memory you may require 01793 841490 or visit www.mem-star.co.uk